Child from the laboratory

The government wants to support artificial insemination more than before. Health insurance companies should make it easier to provide financial aid for it. The University of Bochum warns that couples with an unfulfilled desire to have children are often not sufficiently informed about the negative aspects of artificial insemination. Catholic Church rejects artificial insemination as a way of human reproduction.

Calls for more support for couples who want to have children came from the CSU in particular on Wednesday. The possibility of making more services available is part of a comprehensive "care structure law" passed by the federal cabinet in Berlin. The measure would help "more families to fulfill their desire to have a child," the Federal Ministry for Family Affairs said. In addition, the Federal Minister for Family Affairs, Kristina Schroder (CDU), is seeking further relief for people who want to have children.

Part of the Care Structure Act
The new law drafted by Federal Health Minister Daniel Bahr (FDP) provides for a bundle of measures aimed at improving medical care. This includes the expansion of services offered by health insurance companies, but also, for example, the desire to ensure the rural supply of physicians.

CSU social expert Joachim Unterlander also called for higher subsidies for fertility treatment from the federal government and health insurers. Around 1.5 million people in Germany who lived in a partnership were without children for medical reasons, it said. Every year, 800 people seek.000 couples seek medical advice, said the Bavarian member of the state parliament in Munich. But the current financing of such treatments is a great burden for couples with average incomes, he said.

Bochum University warns of inadequate care
According to a study, couples with an unfulfilled desire to have children are often not sufficiently informed about the negative aspects of artificial insemination. This is the conclusion of a study by the Ruhr University in Bochum, which was published on Wednesday.
Afterwards Reproduktionsmediziner clear patients clearly better about chances of success than about risks and loads. Multiple pregnancies or emotional stress are cited as examples.

Three quarters of those surveyed stated that the desire to have children pushed other life goals into the background. One in two expressed the feeling of losing control of the situation. Experts say patients often have limited ability to decide whether to end treatment with little chance of success. The physicians would not terminate the treatment for their part usually. The Bochum researchers had 1.500 patients and 230 reproductive physicians and 60 psychosocial counselors interviewed.

Catholic Church rejects artificial insemination
The Catholic Church rejects artificial insemination as a way of human reproduction. The Vatican had rejected as unethical all practices involving the destruction of embryos or decoupling procreation from the marital sex act. A couple's desire to have a child is not above the dignity of the life conceived, the faith authority stressed.

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